Sleepy Sunday: Sunshine Blogger Award

An embarrassingly long time ago, I was nominated for the Sunshine Blogger Award by Elizabeth at Echo Edition. The aim of the award is to spread love and support in the blogging community. Thank you for nominating me, Elizabeth!

To do:

  • Thank the person who nominated you and provide a link back to their blog so others can find them.
  • Answer the 11 questions asked by the blogger who nominated you.
  • Nominate 11 other bloggers and ask them 11 new questions.
  • Notify the nominees about it on one of their own posts.
  • List the rules and display the Sunshine Blogger Award logo on your post and/or your blog site.

Questions

What inspires you?
Inspiration is everywhere if I look hard enough: in passersby, in snippets of conversations, even sitting at my desk at work everyday (if I look really hard). That being said, books inspire me the most.

What is the last book you read?
Every Exquisite Thing by Matthew Quick. I was mostly underwhelmed by it, and sometimes it was quite obvious that a man was behind the female protagonist’s voice. But overall, there were a few moments of clarity.

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What do you love that you rarely, if ever, mention on your blog?
K-pop. A while ago, I realised that English-language media has mostly been the default in my life. It’s nice to diversify and discover content that wouldn’t otherwise have been on my radar.

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Sleepy Sunday: The Writer Tag

I’ve been doing a lot more book-related posts lately, so I thought I would change things up and write about writing for once. My genius self googled ‘writer tag’ and one of the results was (surprise surprise) the Writer Tag from InkBlots and IceBergs.

I’ll be answering 20 questions about writing — try it yourself if you like and let me know so I can read your answers.


1. What type of writing do you do?
I mainly write short stories, although I’m trying to build the endurance to write longer fiction. Up until a few weeks ago I was also doing a lot of academic writing, including my dissertation which, given the amount of energy it took, I think counts for something!

2. What genres and/or topics do you write about?
I read a lot of historical and fantasy, so maybe it makes sense that I tend to gravitate to those in my writing as well. As for topics, I’ll write about whatever strikes me as interesting — families, forests, fairies… etc.

3. How long have you been writing?
Since I was about seven years old, I think.

4. Are you published?
No, and this gives me severe imposter syndrome, despite reassurances that I can call myself a writer simply if I write. But deep down, I know this is what I’m meant to do (regardless of how good/bad I might be at it) so I’m going to take a leap of faith on giving myself that label.

5. What was the first story you ever wrote?
Probably something involving a protagonist named Sohini…

giphyI was subtle. | via Giphy, © Nickelodeon

6. Why do you write?
Because it’s fun!

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10 Books That Have Influenced Me

A while ago, I did a post about 10 books that influenced past me. I made that list when I was 18 and after four years and a literature degree, a few things have changed. Here are some of the books that have become important to me in the last few years.


1. The Shock of the Fall by Nathan Filer [fiction]
I’m still reading this, but so far I’m quite in awe. This book manages to incorporate elements of mystery and thriller with what seems like a coming-of-age narrative, complete with a bit of an experimental format that involves playing around with form and images. The timeline of events is a bit confusing with the back and forth, but the pacing is tightly controlled. Even though I haven’t finished yet, I’m sure it’ll be a memorable one.

2. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry [Historical fiction]
This book is set during a time of political upheaval in India, and is one of the books that encouraged me to read even more Indian authors. I loved the characterisation and use of language — especially the way Mistry manages to convey the tones and cadences of Indian languages through English. If you want to know about it in more detail, here is a longer review I’ve written.

3. Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman [fiction]
As I mentioned in my recent reading recap post, this book’s themes of loneliness and finding one’s footing in social situations hit me hard. The characters are human and I started caring about them without even realising. The narrative is so multifaceted that there should be something to appeal to a wide audience — including stories of friendship, love, and kindness.

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